Taylor Smith

Articles

Ashley C. Ford reflects on her time as a student to bestselling author

Ashley C. Ford was nearly 10 years old when she felt it might be true she had an inclination toward writing. Ford was sitting in her third grade classroom during poetry week, and there were two new movies on Ford’s mind that she was “obsessed” with, both starring Leonardo DiCaprio: “Titanic” and “Romeo + Juliet.”


Former Daily News staff reflect on reporting the events of Sept. 11

Tom Gubbins woke up earlier than usual that Tuesday morning. It was before 9 a.m., and his radio was on and set to his typical station, one that would normally play “The Bob & Tom Show.” But, instead of the satirical humor he was used to listening to while getting ready, Gubbins heard announcements from CNN Radio, a station he didn’t know existed.


Rhonda Ward makes strides in promoting diversity in Muncie Community Schools

At the bottom of every email she sends, Rhonda Ward closes with a quote from Vice President Kamala Harris: “Our unity is our strength, and diversity is our power.” As assistant principal of Muncie Central High School and Muncie Community Schools’ (MCS) newest director of diversity, Ward starts every day with the power of diversity pushing her forward and the goal to ensure equality and equity for all MCS community members. 


Bold Type: Not just a fairytale

 Never in my life have I doubted the existence of true love or soul mates — people who were put on this earth to be our perfect match — because I have grown up with two parents whose hearts beat perfectly in sync, and, for me, witnessing 21 years of the love they share is enough proof that true love does exist. 


Bold Type: I Will Speak Up

I am a woman in the workplace. I am one woman on a college campus of 22,000 students — an intellectual trying to save money for her college education by waitressing at one of the only restaurants and bars open during a pandemic — and I am tired of feeling like a trophy rather than a colleague, entertainment rather than an employee.


Bold Type: Eating disorders don’t discriminate

The logic that one can only have an eating disorder if they look a certain way, are a certain gender or weigh a certain number is stereotypical and discourages those who do not fit the societal criteria from seeking help for serious disordered eating.