Kate Farr

Articles

We have the right to strike

If the government is for the people and by the people, then it should be ensuring the working class has strong, secure rights. Workers deserve the right to a clear path for joining unions, promoting negotiations and taking part in collective bargaining.


The fear tied to ageism is growing old

In our society, youth equates to beauty, but it shouldn’t be such a prominent point where it leads to fear. We need to stop ranking women by their age, looks or physical appeal. Women are more than the year they were born or their “fading” youth.


Feeling like the last resort

As climate change enters the therapy room, it needs to be acknowledged that it’s less about a single person’s climate footprint. It’s more about collective effort rather than governments and corporations shifting the blame onto individuals like those of Gen Z.


Behind The Veil: How We Manage Invisible Illnesses

Even when the suffering isn’t always outwardly visible, there’s still the weighty baggage of pain that is oftentimes shouldered by those with invisible conditions. It’s important we keep an open mind so the people who are already feeling alone don’t become more isolated.


Ball State vs. Georgia: Our perspective

The Ball State Daily News Sports crew of sophomore associate sports editor and football secondary reporter Elijah Poe, opinion editor and photographer Kate Farr, associate photo editor Mya Cataline and reporter Zach Carter share their experience following their trip to Athens, Georgia, to cover Ball State V. No. 1 Georgia.


The crumbling division of church and state

Today, we are faced with a religious enthusiasm that seeks faith to serve a foundational role in government. Politicians and judicial leaders are more heavily interweaving their beliefs into places they don’t belong. There is no religious test to hold office, so why allow religion to intersect with the crucial legislative action that affects every citizen?


A case of censorship: revising Roald Dahl’s books

In February of this year, many of Roald Dahl’s famed children's books were re-released in Britain, but not without some rewrites and revisions first. Should we be updating any and all literature, especially posthumously, for readers today? Is it pushing a certain agenda that not everyone stands on common ground with? Or, could measures of censorship even be promoting an all-or-nothing mindset?


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